My blog has moved.

You can find me at my new home, jlperidot.com, and at my new blog, blog.jlperidot.com.

My mailing list signup is now available at DOT CLUB.

And selected (NSFW) free reads are available on my Vocal profile.

Or, if you like, you can keep reading this site for shareworthy stuff I’ve stumbled upon.

The Great HEA Event with @AuthorSarahS! #GreatHEAEvent

Sarah’s work has always helped me power through stressful times. It’s no surprise she’d have this to say about Happily Ever Afters!

Rosanna Leo

Anyone who follows me will likely have seen me shout my love for author Sarah Smith. Not only is she talented and kind, she works so hard to help other writers, myself included. I’m thrilled Sarah could join us today, and I can’t wait to read her newest story!

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Why are HEAs important to me? Because reality is chaotic and unpredictable and a lot of times filled with sad and depressing events that you can’t control. But in romance? HEAs are always, always there. Knowing that no matter what the characters in this story will get the happily ever after they deserve gives me so much joy. In a world where happy endings aren’t always guaranteed, the promise of HEAs in romance helps me power through. 

My upcoming romance ON LOCATION has one hell of an HEA! It’s out Sept. 21, be sure to preorder!

On Location by Sarah Echavarre…

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The Great HEA Event with @Simpson_Romance! #GreatHEAEvent

“I give myself happy ever afters. It is a radical act and rejects both ableism and the insidious nature of eugenics. We live at the end of the story, and not only that, we thrive. We’re not cured and are happy.”

Rosanna Leo

The best part of this event, aside from sharing the love of HEAs, is getting to introduce you to authors whose work I enjoy. Stefanie Simpson is here today! I recently read her book Restoration Love, and it’s a wonderful romance. Welcome, Stefanie!

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We deserve happiness, especially in these times. The world is a dark and frightening place. Many people turn to art to process or escape, and romance serves a particular framework: a fantasy through which to explore pretty much anything with the guarantee of a positive outcome. There. The HEA. 

Disabled people in fiction, generally, do not get that, and we’re not unique in this regard, but we only exist in fiction to (1) inspire non-disabled folk to make them feel better about their own lives (2) tragedy, we die or suffer to make non-disabled folk feel better about their own lives (3) the villain, this…

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The Great HEA Event with @mariahankenman! #GreatHEAEvent

Great perspective on HEA (happily ever after) endings in books by Mariah Ankenman, presented by Rosanna Leo.

Rosanna Leo

I’m excited to welcome Mariah Ankenman to the blog with her thoughts on HEA! I just read her book The Best Man Problem, and it was so enjoyable.

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Why is an HEA important to me? One word: Hope.

Let’s face it, romance gets a bad rep. People often ask me why I write and read romance. They call it unrealistic, sappy, smutty. But they’re missing the bigger picture romance has to offer…hope. What’s the one rule in romance? HEA/HFN or GTFO. A romance must have a happily ever after or a happy for now to be considered a romance. Why is that rule necessary? Because the romance genre is all about hope.

We read these stories, fall in love with these characters, root for their happy ending because if they can find joy and happiness it gives us hope that we can find it too. It’s the hope…

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Pin-ups

Short and smart read.

By Hugh Cartwright

I despise the red-light district, but I’ve no choice. I must visit Charlene.

Her window is her calling-card. Scarlet underwear slung along a curtain rail, draped against the glass. Panties heavy with trinkets and tokens left by grateful clients, mementos safety-pinned up as they depart.

A woman ushers me into the blood-red room.

Charlene’s “busy right now,” so I must wait. Within moments my nerves get the better of me, and I turn to leave.

But first, I add my own contribution.

I safety-pin my husband’s wedding ring to her D-cup bra.

I’m certain he’ll see it by tomorrow.


Hugh lives in the Pacific Northwest, where he writes to provide relief from his hopeless goal of growing Canadian oranges.

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